Hong Kong Hospital Keeps Organ Harvesting Evidence Secret

Queen_Mary_Hospital_David_Matas-676x450By  | December 10, 2013

HONG KONG—Queen Mary Hospital is home to a database of China’s liver transplants that holds evidence that can be used to help expose the practice of forced, live organ harvesting in China.

“The Chinese Communist Party government is covering up this crime, and part of … [the coverup] is taking place at Hong Kong’s Queen Mary Hospital,” said Canadian human rights lawyer David Matas at a Nov. 28 forum held in Hong Kong by Doctors Against Forced Organ Harvesting (DAFOH), a Washington, D.C.-based human rights organization.

The database is closed to the public, but it wasn’t always that way, according to Matas who has spent years investigating the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) organ harvesting from Falun Gong practitioners and other prisoners of conscience.

Reaction to a comment from Dr. Jeremy Chapman – by David Matas

Reaction to a comment from Dr. Jeremy Chapman

07 December 2013

Dr. Jeremy Chapman, former president of The Transplantation Society, has been quoted as having made this comment about the killing of Falun Gong for their organs: “I heard your accusations that it was happening. I have seen no evidence of using any executed prisoners other than through judicial process in China. There are stories of criminal murders, which have occurred in China, individual cases. David Matas’ report does not provide evidence. You are seeing smoke and saying this fire is burning FLG victims, and you are not showing us that data. I can’t substantiate it. We are very clear that China should not use organs from executed prisoners.”

The source of the quotation is Christine Hond, Australian Epoch Times. See
http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/382146-transplant-doctors-concerned-about-china-organ-trade/

My reaction is this:

It is true that The Transplantation Society has been clear that China should not use organs from prisoners and that is to their credit. Sourcing of organs from prisoners, any prisoners, is ethically wrong, according to medical ethics.

Sourcing from prisoners of conscience, including Falun Gong, is more than just a violation of medical ethics; it is a crime against humanity. Whether the crime has been committed is not or should not be a matter of indifference to the profession.

One consequence from establishing the existence of the crime would be avoidance of collaboration with criminal transplant professionals. As well, the international transplant profession, if it is established the crime has been committed, would be, I suspect, the first to want to call for prosecution of the perpetrators.

Prevention and Cure – by David Matas

Combating organ transplant Abuse in China: New Developments

(Remarks prepared for a forum in Taipei, Taiwan, 28 February 2013)
David Matas

I. Introduction
The bulk of organs for transplants in China come from prisoners of conscience, predominantly practitioners of the spiritually based set of exercises Falun Gong. That was the conclusion of research in reports published in June 2006, January 2007, and in the book Bloody Harvest, November 2009 all of which I co-authored with David Kilgour and in the book State Organs August 2012 I co-edited with Torsten Trey.

One reason, amongst many, that David Kilgour and I came to the conclusion we did is that the precautions which should be in place to prevent the abuse were not in place. After the first version of our report, we launched on a global advocacy campaign to attempt to end the abuse we had identified. The book State Organs is a reflection and continuation of that campaign by joining together professionals from around the world, each making their own contribution to the ongoing effort.

Since the release of the first version of our report, more than six and a half years have passed. In the intervening period, much has changed, and not always for the better. This paper focuses on the changes both in China and abroad, the changes in China for better and worse and the changes abroad to attempt to prevent the abuse and to remedy the wrongs inflicted.

Misgovernance, Predatory Economy and Organ Trafficking in China – by Hon. David Kilgour, J.D.

Civita Norway
Oslo
21 November 2013

Permit me to begin by stressing that my respect for the Chinese people is longstanding. It grew during several visits to the country and meeting both nationals and members of the vast Chinese Diaspora. It is no accident that more than one million Canadians of origin in the Middle Kingdom are our most-educated cultural community. It was an honour to represent many of them in our Parliament for almost twenty seven years. Let me also note here something that diplomats, sinologists, journalists and business executives sometimes forget: China is its peoples, cultures and history far more than its unelected government. The criticisms many of us within and beyond China have are of its governance, but we also acknowledge that the economic policies of paramount leader Deng enabled hundreds of millions of Chinese families to lift themselves by hard work and intelligence out of grinding poverty–a state of affairs that existed unimproved from 1949 until the thrice-purged Deng made major reforms in the economy beginning in 1978.

The Killing of Falun Gong for their Organs: Individual Cases – by David Matas

Revised remarks

William Pitt Union, University of Pittsburgh

28 March 2013

The conclusion that practitioners of the spiritually based set of exercises Falun Gong have been killed in large numbers for their organs relies on the confluence of a number of evidentiary trails. This evidence does not necessarily identify individual victims. Sometimes I am asked to do just that, to name names.

This request may be made out of scepticism. When I say that tens of thousands of practitioners of Falun Gong have been killed for their organs, sometimes I get the retort, name one.

Alternatively, the request to identify individual cases is made because activism around an individual case may be easier than advocacy around a general phenomenon. It is harder for the Government of China to skate round an inquiry when it is pointed, when we tell them of the name of the victim, the date of the victimization and the place where it occurred.

State Organs – Introduction

jpeg-1The purpose of medicine is to provide care for those who suffer. The Hippocratic Oath commits medical doctors to not do harm. Giving a lethal drug to anyone or advising such an action violates that oath. Yet, in China, we can see that this ethical principle is violated by the taking of organs from prisoners, including prisoners of conscience. These prisoners of conscience are mostly practitioners of Falun Gong, but also include Uighurs, Tibetans and others.

While organ transplant abuse exists in many countries, China presents a unique situation, a country where state institutions are heavily implicated in the abuse. How do we stop the killing in China of innocents for their organs?

There appear to be three basic answers to that question. One is to end the persecution against a particular group such as Falun Gong, which was banned in China in 1999 because the then leader of the Communist Party, Jiang Zemin, feared that its popularity would threaten the ideological supremacy of the Party. The second is to end the network of slave labour camps in China, euphemistically called “re-education through labour camps”, where detained Falun Gong are mostly housed and which have become vast forced organ donor banks. The third is to end the killing of prisoners for their organs in general. End the killing of all prisoners for their organs, and then the killing of prisoners of conscience for their organs would inevitably cease.

Chinese Blind Spot – by Ethan Gutmann

BY ETHAN GUTMANN Investigating Chinese surveillance is a rather lonely job. For all the dissidents yammering about dramatic arrests and torture and harvesting of organs, you can’t really guarantee publication or much of an audience unless you can prove that there are links to America: brand name corporations, scary cutting-edge U.S. technology, insidious Washington collusion. That’s…

China’s Gruesome Organ Harvest – The whole world isn’t watching – by Ethan Gutmann

NOV 24, 2008, VOL. 14, NO. 10 • BY ETHAN GUTMANN

Bangkok

The jeepney driver sizes us up the minute we climb in. My research assistant is a healthy, young Israeli dude, so I must be the one with the money. He addresses his broken English to me: “Girl?”

No. No girls. Take us to the …

“Ladyboy? Kickboxer?”

No. No ladyboy, no kickboxer, thanks. I may be a paunchy, sweaty, middle-aged white guy, but I’m here to–well, actually, I am on my way to meet a Chinese woman in a back alley. She is going to tell me intimate stories of humiliation, torture, and abuse. And the truly shameful part is that after 50 or so interviews with refugees from Chinese labor camps, I won’t even be listening that closely.

Testimony of Ethan Gutmann – “Human Rights in China”

House International Relations Committee
Subcommittee on Africa, Global Human Rights and International Operations

Wednesday, April 19, 2006, 10:30 A.M.
2172 Rayburn House Office Building.

Mr. Chairman, thank you for inviting me to make a contribution to the Committee’s profoundly important work.

Approximately two months ago, your Committee heard representatives of Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, and Cisco Systems defend their companies’ role in constructing China’s Internet. Simultaneously the Committee floated an extremely important draft – the Global Online Freedom Act of 2006 – which appeared to place this committee and the aforementioned companies on a collision course. Some commentators, particularly those searching for a middle way, characterized the Online Freedom Act as an “overreaction.” I don’t agree. I believe that it is better characterized as a tragedy.

I would guess that few people in this room actually desire intrusive government intervention and oversight of U.S. companies. I certainly don’t. I’m a former consultant to American corporations operating in China and a former vice-chair of the Government Relations Committee for the American Chamber of Commerce Beijing. I’m also a former believer in the concept that we would change China, not that China would change us.